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Hey what's goin' on I'm Amalia. I'm studying towards a MChem, chemistry degree at Smith College. My main research interests include neurochemistry, bioengineering, psychopharmacology, biopsychiatry, & synthetic biology.

Posted on 31st Jul at 5:04 PM, with 297 notes
overzealousgirl:

Researchers in the US are developing ‘organs-on-a-chip’ - an entire electronic set of human organs that can take the guesswork, and animals, out of drug testing.

“We are learning more and more that mice and rats don’t predict humans. The shortcomings of animal testing are becoming clear.”

Source.
View high resolution

overzealousgirl:

Researchers in the US are developing ‘organs-on-a-chip’ - an entire electronic set of human organs that can take the guesswork, and animals, out of drug testing.

“We are learning more and more that mice and rats don’t predict humans. The shortcomings of animal testing are becoming clear.”

Source.

Posted on 31st Jul at 2:08 PM, with 590 notes
compoundchem:

An update to the previous graphic on organic functional groups today, with some additions and refinements to make it a little clearer.
As always, you can download the PDF on the site: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-3c
View high resolution

compoundchem:

An update to the previous graphic on organic functional groups today, with some additions and refinements to make it a little clearer.

As always, you can download the PDF on the site: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-3c

Posted on 31st Jul at 9:25 AM, with 85 notes
"Why do you want to be in school for so long?"
Posted on 31st Jul at 9:24 AM, with 122,126 notes

geoffrox:

Imagine if the series had ended right after this moment.

Tagged: #chemistry lol,
Posted on 31st Jul at 4:00 AM, with 28,703 notes

superagentfalcon:

little baby bats in little baby bat blankets for keenan

Posted on 30th Jul at 7:50 PM, with 926 notes
amnhnyc:

On land, sunlight illuminates a world that’s bright and bursting with color. But in the ocean, light and color diminish as the water gets deeper. Take a look at what happens to light as it moves through the water, and how marine organisms have adapted.
Learn more in our traveling exhibition, Creatures of Light.  
View high resolution

amnhnyc:

On land, sunlight illuminates a world that’s bright and bursting with color. But in the ocean, light and color diminish as the water gets deeper. Take a look at what happens to light as it moves through the water, and how marine organisms have adapted.

Learn more in our traveling exhibition, Creatures of Light.  

Posted on 30th Jul at 7:46 PM, with 66,251 notes

magnezone:

please don’t ever try to get my attention by neglecting me because i will alienate myself from you at terminal velocity 

Posted on 30th Jul at 6:47 PM, with 765 notes

victoriousvocabulary:

PHARMACOLOGY

[noun]

the branch of medicine and biology concerned with the study of drug action, where a drug can be broadly defined as any man-made, natural, or endogenous (within the body) molecule which exerts a biochemical and/or physiological effect on the cell, tissue, organ, or organism.

Etymology: from Greek φάρμακον, pharmakon, “poison” in classic Greek, “drug” in modern Greek; and -λογία, -logia, “study of”, “knowledge of”.

[Julia Yellow]

Posted on 30th Jul at 6:11 PM, with 51 notes
ibmblr:

ART IN SCIENCE"Majesty Under Microscopy”IBM Research - Zurich2012
Since when did carbon-carbon bonds get so pretty? This nanographene molecule, synthesized in Toulouse, France, shows us the beauty of ‘bond-order discrimination.’  This splendor in chroma is achieved by atomic force microscopy using a carbon monoxide functionalized tip. Luckily, like any work of art, you don’t have to understand it to enjoy it. 
View high resolution

ibmblr:

ART IN SCIENCE
"Majesty Under Microscopy
IBM Research - Zurich
2012

Since when did carbon-carbon bonds get so pretty? This nanographene molecule, synthesized in Toulouse, France, shows us the beauty of ‘bond-order discrimination.’  This splendor in chroma is achieved by atomic force microscopy using a carbon monoxide functionalized tip. Luckily, like any work of art, you don’t have to understand it to enjoy it. 

Posted on 30th Jul at 2:12 PM, with 692 notes
marinemammalblog:

Polar bears are so good at trapping in heat, they are almost invisible to heat sensing cameras.

marinemammalblog:

Polar bears are so good at trapping in heat, they are almost invisible to heat sensing cameras.

Posted on 30th Jul at 11:43 AM, with 129 notes

mediclopedia:

Stanford Med is doing an amazing series on “surgeons at work”. There are stories of people’s journey to becoming a surgeon, exciting new frontiers in surgery, and people’s thoughts regarding the future of medicine. 

This specific set of photos are by Dr. Max Aguilera-Hellweg. The emotion of the OR that this image captures is amazing right?

Posted on 30th Jul at 11:33 AM, with 25 notes
Anonymous asked: Hello young woman. I have a question of intellectual proportions to ask you. Do you think molecules have sex and that's how other molecules came to be? Like, two big ol' stands of DNA just inserting and then little baby grows in their DNA belly? That would make so much sense. Cells are like the hospitals of DNA babies. RNAs are just the baby doctors, pullin' out the babies you know. I hope this is a question that mentally stimulates you and we can discuss this further.

how high are you

Posted on 30th Jul at 11:04 AM, with 262 notes
cenwatchglass:

Buckminsterfullerene, C60, with isosurface of ground state electron density (calculated with DFT, the CPMD code). File was rendered using VMD. Credit: ltamblyn/Wikimedia Commons.
CARBON IS THE KEY ELEMENT not only of terrestrial life but also of minerals (carbonates) and fossil fuels (oil, gas, and coal), and it is a minor but essential component of our atmosphere. Carbon is produced in the stars by nuclear synthesis from hydrogen that originated from the initial Big Bang. Over the eons, asteroids hitting Earth may have carried carbon to our planet.
Elemental carbon is found in nature as its allotropes—diamond and graphite—which are of vastly differing abundance and thus also of differing value. In the 1980s, a new group of allotropes called fullerenes or buckyballs—named after R. Buckminster Fuller, who designed famous geodesic domes resembling soccer balls—was recognized, first spectroscopically (for which Robert E. Curl Jr., Sir Harold W. Kroto, and Richard E. Smalley received the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry) and later produced in electric discharge devices using carbon electrodes (Donald R. Huffman and Wolfgang Kratschmer). These new carbon allotropes promise significant applications. Carbon has a remarkable ability to bind with itself to form chains, rings, and complex structures. The variety of carbon compounds with bound hydrogen (hydrocarbons) and other elements (oxygen, nitrogen, and phosphorus, for example), which are generally called organic compounds, is practically unlimited.
-George Olah
It’s Elemental!: Carbon
Chemical & Engineering News, September 8, 2003
View high resolution

cenwatchglass:

Buckminsterfullerene, C60, with isosurface of ground state electron density (calculated with DFT, the CPMD code). File was rendered using VMD. Credit: ltamblyn/Wikimedia Commons.

CARBON IS THE KEY ELEMENT not only of terrestrial life but also of minerals (carbonates) and fossil fuels (oil, gas, and coal), and it is a minor but essential component of our atmosphere. Carbon is produced in the stars by nuclear synthesis from hydrogen that originated from the initial Big Bang. Over the eons, asteroids hitting Earth may have carried carbon to our planet.

Elemental carbon is found in nature as its allotropes—diamond and graphite—which are of vastly differing abundance and thus also of differing value. In the 1980s, a new group of allotropes called fullerenes or buckyballs—named after R. Buckminster Fuller, who designed famous geodesic domes resembling soccer balls—was recognized, first spectroscopically (for which Robert E. Curl Jr., Sir Harold W. Kroto, and Richard E. Smalley received the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry) and later produced in electric discharge devices using carbon electrodes (Donald R. Huffman and Wolfgang Kratschmer). These new carbon allotropes promise significant applications. Carbon has a remarkable ability to bind with itself to form chains, rings, and complex structures. The variety of carbon compounds with bound hydrogen (hydrocarbons) and other elements (oxygen, nitrogen, and phosphorus, for example), which are generally called organic compounds, is practically unlimited.

-George Olah

It’s Elemental!: Carbon

Chemical & Engineering News, September 8, 2003

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