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Hey what's goin' on I'm Amalia. I'm studying towards a MChem, chemistry degree at Smith College. My main research interests include neurochemistry, bioengineering, psychopharmacology, biopsychiatry, & synthetic biology.

Posted on 30th Sep at 5:00 AM, with 320 notes
misbehavedscientist:

jtotheizzoe:

A Euk with a Uke on a Cuc.
Part 1 of a series which may end with this animation in which I make animations from funny biology rhymes that pop in my head.

hahahaha
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misbehavedscientist:

jtotheizzoe:

A Euk with a Uke on a Cuc.

Part 1 of a series which may end with this animation in which I make animations from funny biology rhymes that pop in my head.

hahahaha

Posted on 29th Sep at 9:22 PM, with 1,870 notes

archiemcphee:

Bangkok-based photographer Visarute Angkatavanich (previously featured here) continues to take breathtaking photos of Siamese fighting fish, also known as betta fish. His fascination with their splendid, flowing fins and brilliant coloring is apparent in the extraordinarily detailed portraits he creates. The photos are so perfectly clear and close-up that it’s easy to forget the fish are underwater and not floating in midair.

Angkatavanich recently told Popular Photography that he only started photographing the fish after encountering them for the first time three years ago at a fish show and has since become obsessed with the different species which vary greatly in size, shape, and color patterns.

Head over to Visarute Angkatavanich’s 500px gallery to view more of his gorgeous betta portraits. Limited edition prints of his photos are currently available through La Lanta Fine Art.

[via Colossal]

Posted on 29th Sep at 9:16 PM, with 63 notes
classicccc
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classicccc

Tagged: #me,
Posted on 26th Sep at 12:16 PM, with 102 notes
bpod-mrc:

26 September 2014
Enhanced Cancer Drugs
This is a cluster of breast cancer cells (shown in blue) in which some cells (pink) are dying after treatment with a drug called doxorubicin, which triggers apoptosis or programmed cell-death – where cells effectively commit suicide. Doxorubicin is also toxic to non-cancerous cells, and heart cells in particular, which limits the amount that doctors can give to patients. To overcome the problem, researchers want to deliver the drug directly to tumours in molecules chemically modified to target cancer cells. One promising approach is to combine the drug with dendrimers, repetitively branched snowflake-like molecules that can be tailor-made to have particular properties. When doxorubicin was combined with a dendrimer known to inhibit blood vessel growth, the complex penetrated tumours better than the drug alone in living mice and killed more cancer cells. The results suggest that this combination could be a good way to design new cancer drugs.
Written by Daniel Cossins
—
Image by Khuloud T Al-Jamal and Izzat Suffian from the Wellcome Image Awards 2014Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook
View high resolution

bpod-mrc:

26 September 2014

Enhanced Cancer Drugs

This is a cluster of breast cancer cells (shown in blue) in which some cells (pink) are dying after treatment with a drug called doxorubicin, which triggers apoptosis or programmed cell-death – where cells effectively commit suicide. Doxorubicin is also toxic to non-cancerous cells, and heart cells in particular, which limits the amount that doctors can give to patients. To overcome the problem, researchers want to deliver the drug directly to tumours in molecules chemically modified to target cancer cells. One promising approach is to combine the drug with dendrimers, repetitively branched snowflake-like molecules that can be tailor-made to have particular properties. When doxorubicin was combined with a dendrimer known to inhibit blood vessel growth, the complex penetrated tumours better than the drug alone in living mice and killed more cancer cells. The results suggest that this combination could be a good way to design new cancer drugs.

Written by Daniel Cossins

Image by Khuloud T Al-Jamal and Izzat Suffian from the Wellcome Image Awards 2014
Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

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